Breaking: footage of George Floyd resisting arrest & dropping drugs

CNN falsely reports that George Floyd did not resist arrest– when in fact he did.

June 3rd 2020

CNN, MSNBC and many other mainstream media outlets have been reporting on the George Floyd case. A 46-year old unarmed black man who was killed by a white officer police Dereck Chauvin who obviously used unjustifed excessive force by placing his entire body weight on Floyd’s neck while restraining him.

Floyd used a fake $20 bill to purchase cigarettes at a Minneapolis convenience store that prompted a cashier to call police after the cashier followed him to his SUV to ask for the item back, Floyd refused. The cashier reported to police that Floyd was belligerent and reaked of alcohol.

CNN and other news outlets reported that Floyd did not resist arrest and attempted to peacefully go into police custody for questioning.

After some deep digging, I found this to be a lie! Officers attempted to put Floyd in the back seat of a police cruiser but Floyd appears to kick at the officers while inside the backseat of the car and crawls out to the other side of the vehicle where two other officers manage to wrestle him to the ground.

(YouTube video link below)

This is when officer Chauvin places his knee on the neck of Floyd for several minutes to which ultimately contributed to his death i.e.- asphyxiation.

A  Minneapolis Medical Examiners toxicology report also shows that Floyd had two extremely deadly substances in his body – methamphetamine and Fentanyl, which  may have further contributed to his death. Close up video surveillance shows Floyd dropping a plastic bag filled with a white substance while handcuffed. I couldn’t find any police reports stating what was in that bag or if any officers are aware that he managed to dump it out while handcuffed.

Conspiracy theorists say that the toxicology report is fake and an attempted cover up, however a background investigation shows that Floyd has been arrested multiple times for drug possession and other crimes which suggest familiarity with illegal substances.

George Floyd was arrested numerous times for drug charges and robbery that included him sticking a gun to a pregnant woman’s stomach while his friends robbed the home.

An independent autopsy was performed at the request of Floyd’s  family which concluded that he died from asphyxiation, however the independent autopsy did not perform a toxicology analysis as the Minneapolis medical examiners did.

While there is no question that Floyd was a victim of excessive force, and Officer Chauvin deserves a prison sentence, we should shame the mainstream media for failing to report the full story. Instead, they immediately spun the narrative that Floyd was an innocent black man minding his own business where he was brutally attacked by white officers for no apparent reason.

The reason the mainstream media did this is simple…. headlines using “White Vs Black” narratives gets more views and more views means more money for the news networks from advertisers!

Don’t fall for the manufactured race wars! Its not white vs black,  it’s rich vs poor. Ask Daniel Shaver or Kelly Thomas, two white victims of police brutality to which the media largely ignored because they knew it wouldn’t get much viewership. Abuse of power doesn’t discriminate against those who dont know their rights or who cant afford a good lawyer.

Mainstream media has no qualms about inciting race wars if it gets people to tune in and watch. More views= More money. Drama sales. Headlines involving proposed racism sale.

With all of that being said, officers need to be trained better in defensive tactics, de-esculation, and we need to remove arrest/ticketing quotas on officers that encourage them to go after easy targets—the poor and uninformed.

When officers are promoted to a higher rank based on positive community opinions rather than stressful arrest quotas, both officers and civilians will be put in a much less stressful scenario.

Until then…..

#justiceForGeorge #justiceForShaver #JusticeForThomas #ReformPolicing

Filipino President, Duterte, receives criticisms over “Drug War”

Since taking office in June of 2016, President Duterte, has been a strong proponent of increasing sanctions against drug users and sellers, and by “sanctions”, I mean death.  While many countries such as Denmark, treat drug issues primarily as a medical concern rather than a criminal one, the Filipino president appears to have reversed this European precedent.

The 45 years long war on drugs in the United States, is also a very controversial topic that mirrors many of the same criticisms. Whereas the United States boasts the largest prison population on the planet, primarily caused by harsh drug laws, the Philippines is going a step further by using death as a means of punishment instead of incarceration or rehabilitation programs. On the surface, it may seem to be a swift strategy of “no tolerance” against the destructive nature of drug manufacturing. However, just like in any “war”, innocent casualties will also become a factor. The government has said over 3,800 were killed in legitimate anti-illegal drug operations. Human rights groups peg the number of deaths at over 13,000, but the administration has dismissed this figure as overblown.

Duterte recently scaled back his drug war, tapping the smaller Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency as the lead government body to enforce the campaign and relegating the police force to a supporting role.  This resulted in the Philippine National Police to terminate its controversial house-to-house anti-drug campaign “Oplan Tokhang” (knock and plead).

These “door step” trials can sometimes result in “trigger happy” officers firing on innocent people, house pets, or minor children, such as in the case of  17-year-old Kian Loyd delos Santos, who was dragged past a basketball court into a dead-end screaming, “Please can I go home. I have school tomorrow”. He was given a gun and told to run, whereas he was essentially killed by a firing squad. A perfectly staged killing set up by public servants against their own citizens.

Just as in all forms of law enforcement, there must be a balance between deterrence through punishment and a gentle hand of compassion in order to change the law, repeal the law, or rehabilitate the offender. A society ran on fear will never flourish just as in the days of Feudal Japan or the Monarchy of Britain that ruled over the American Colonists.

New York-based Human Rights Watch (HRW) said world leaders should raise concern about Duterte’s war on drugs, which has seen thousands dead, mostly from the urban poor.

“Surely someone from among the 20 world leaders at these summits can confront Duterte about his horrific and unprecedented ‘drug war’ killings,” Brad Adams, HRW Asia Director, said in a statement.

The President’s son, Paolo Duterte, 42, appeared last month before a senate inquiry to deny accusations made by an opposition lawmaker that he was a member of a Chinese triad gang who helped smuggle in a huge shipment of crystal methamphetamine from China.

President Duterte pledged to protect police officers should they decide to murder his son if the allegations are indeed found to be true, in a speech made to the public. President Duterte claims that the law is not exempt for anyone under his Drug War parameters, including himself or family members.

Protesters soon rallied afterwards holding signs saying, “Stop the killings!”, “No rule by Martial Law”.  Many of the protesters grew up in the era of the Marcos family who ruled over the Philippines for years using Martial Law tactics that involved extra-judicial killings and suppression of free-speech alongside the ban of private gun ownership.

Duterte responded to the protesters by saying, “I would be happy to slaughter the 3 million drug addicts in this country”, whereas he went on to describe any children killed in the drug war as “collateral damage”.  Leaders in the Catholic church, the country’s dominant religion, have also spoken out against these harsh tactics used in this drug war.

Archbishop Socrates Villegas, president of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines, denounced the drug killings at another mass on Thursday, saying Catholics must do more than lighting candles for the dead and helping orphans. “Stand up. To keep quiet in the face of evil is a sin,” he said.

President Duterte is still in the early stages of his presidency. It isn’t too late for him to turn things around and have a change of heart. Like many great leaders, good intentions often pave the way to hell. While few doubt that the president doesn’t means well in his effort to solve the drug use problem in the Philippines, few agree that instituting a civil war against your own people in order to solve that problem can be a viable remedy.

We pray that world leaders will discuss alternative methods of curbing drug use in the Philippines with Duterte during upcoming conferences. Perhaps, such conversations will also influence American leaders who have also refused to adopt a more European approach towards solving drug use problems with medical solutions rather than criminal solutions. Currently the United States is spending over $51 billion dollars a year on drug enforcement measurements. A figure that many argue could be funneled into more productive rehabilitation programs. We can only pray that Duterte and other leaders who use similar tactics will be paying attention to the words of protestors and human rights organizations in the coming months leading up to a new election cycle.

 

Nalini-Global

2017

Randell Stroud

Tennessee Civil Asset Forfeiture Challenged by Nalini-Global

On 10/17/2017 , the Metro Nashville Council, held a meeting on resolution RS2017-920- Shared Equitable Program 

This bill proposed that assets seized during police activities that are to later be sold would be divided up between local police departments and the federal DEA.  On the surface, it would appear that this bill is simply creating a working relationship between the local police and the DEA in order to help rid our communities of illegal drug peddling.

However, anyone who is educated on the activities of the DEA, who frequently engage in unconstitutional marijuana raids in states that have legalized the plant and are also known to engage in shady business practices such as entrapment operations. The pink elephant is not the collusion between state and federal governments, but rather the act of civil asset forfeiture, the practice of taking the property of merely “suspected” criminals, whereas those items are later sold at-profit in benefit of the government.

While I don’t support drug use, I do believe the issue should be treated medically, not criminally, and furthermore, the government should not be a beneficiary to such activities . To deem something “illegal”, and then to profit from such illegal activities seems to be more patronizing than benevolent.

The bill was ultimately deffered to be re-voted upon at a later date.  A small victory, albeit for how long can we curb these practices in Tennessee and elsewhere?

Read my statement to the Metro Council here:  (Click here)

  • Nalini-Global 2017